Bonfire

Isn’t it strange…

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we make Ravana to set him on fire (later)?

 

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source: Pinterest

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A Seer Sees It…Differently

The two sishya’s (disciples) were arguing over some matter.

The voices and the tempers were raising, not realizing the seer was close by.

The seer hoped they would quickly reach a closure.

But it was not to be. It went on for a while.

The seer decided to intervene. He walked up to them and requested them to sort things out amicably without sullying the decorum of the Mutt (institution).

A visitor around at that time observed all that happened.

Politely approaching the seer he asked him why he did not order the errant sjshya’s sternly to behave themselves. After all they were followers of the Mutt. Why make a polite request?

‘You must have read stories about our Rishi’s,’ the seer said to the visitor. ‘And, how predators (tigers) and preys (deer) drank water from the same pond side by side in the ashram’s of our venerable Rishi’s.’

The visitor waited for the seer to continue.

‘It all happened because of the tapas (practice of severe austerities, penances) of the Rishi’s. And here I’m, you’ve with your eyes seen what is mine (thapo-balam, strength of my tapas). Why blame them?’

‘So much more to do,’ muttered the seer, almost inaudibly, as he walked away in sadness.

 

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Source: Based on a real incident in the life of revered acharya Incjimedu Azhagiyasingar, the 42nd pontiff of Ahobila Mutt (1879-1953). Narrated by venerable Shri Anantha Padmanabhachariar.

 

 

Sage Vyasa Earns A Respite…

 

Enjoy this literary gem from the inexhaustible treasure of Mahabharatha!

The story how Mahabharatha was recorded goes like this: Sage Vyasa managed to get Vinayaka as his scribe for the task upon one condition: Vyasa must narrate without a single pause. The sage accepted it with one proviso: Vinayaka must understand what is being said before writing it down. This innocuous ‘clause’ put to good use enabled Vyasa to compose the epic without a break!

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Here’s an instance where the sage used a brilliant literary artifice to gain time:

Background: It is in Virata Parva. The mandated year of remaining incognito had just expired for the Pandava’s. Duryodhana labouring under a miscalculation amassed his troops in full strength and raided the border areas of Virata herding away their cattle. This was planned to draw the Pandava’s out prematurely from their hiding and thus gyp them of their rights once more – they would surely come to the aid of Virata in the face of this provocation and thus expose themselves. .

Scene: A chariot is seen to be coming towards them from a distance. Duryodhana wondered who could be the warrior venturing out thus all by himself?

Pitamaha Bhishma standing by his side responds, in Vyasa’s words:

‘Gangajalam keshava naari ketu’

Four words totally unrelated to each other! What sense to make out of them?

Gangajalam = water of River Ganges; keshava = a name given to god Vishnu; naari = woman; ketu = a planetary god.

Of course, Vinayaka figured it out not before giving Vyasa a much-needed respite. Here’s how:

Ganga ja: One Ganges gave birth to = Bhishma;

lam kesha = lankesha = Ravana, King of Lanka;

vana ari = one who destroyed the vana (Ashoka vana where Sita was held captive)

ketu = flag;

Now it reads as: Bhishma (said): It’s one who has on his flag one who destroyed Ravana’s vana = It’s one who has Aanjaneya on his flag = Arjuna.

So it was Arjuna on a chariot driven by the young prince of Virata!

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Clever, isn’t it?

The story goes on from here to record how Arjuna single-handedly defeated the entire force of Kaurava’s in this episode.

Am glad from inside languages like Sanskrit, Tamizh…would continue to confound smartest of lexical analysers!

This is from an upanyasam on Hari Vamsam by venerable Shri Anantha Padmanabhachariar.

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Source: images from Pinterest

Architectural Marvel: Thanjavur Brihadeeswar Temple

Brihadeeswarar Temple is 1000 years old, in Thanjavur. The amazing architecture of this temple makes it unique and stupendous. This video tells us about the facts of how this magnificent temple was built” – from Madras Trends

Duration 3.27 mins with subtitles in English:

 

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PS: There many other videos on the net, small and big, on this temple and its features. This one from Madras Trends is vide Vidya Dwarakanath.