Monthly Archives: January 2021

Kindness Knows No Home!

Source: A WhatsApp forward

**

It was the night of 30th Dec. And it was cold out there.

They were returning from a party at a friend’s place. 

As they were hitting the main road, at the corner he caught sight of a homeless beggar squat on the pavement and pulling tight around himself a torn shawl, not entirely successful in holding off the shivering cold.

He slowed down and stopped the car a little distance ahead.

‘What happened? Why’re you stopping the car? Any problem?’ his wife got a wee bit tense.

‘No, nothing wrong with the car. Look there, an old man shivering in cold.’

‘So?’

‘We have a shawl with us in there. Let’s give it to him.’

‘What? That expensive stuff we bought for my mom?’

’Let me get it…what to do? There’s nothing else to spare…we’ll get another one for your mom.’

‘You know what? He is not going to use it, let me tell you. He’ll trade it in for some weed. They do it all the time.’

He picked up the shawl from the seat behind and got down.

Went up to the man, draped the shawl around the startled man fearing worse. Stepped back to have a look. With a wave of has hand, left him behind and returned to the car.

They came home in silence.

On 31st night once again there was a party they attended more or less in the same area.

Later they took the same route on the way back home.

The homeless beggar was at his spot.

‘See, what I told you, I can’t see the shawl,’ observed the wife.

He stopped the car and both of them got down.

‘What Baba, where’s the shawl we gave you yesterday? Bought yourself some ganja with it, eh?’ the wife said mockingly.

A bony arm stuck out pointing to a figure crouching on the pavement some distance away, shrouded in what appeared to be the shawl.

His voice was tremulous: ‘One leg, polio affected. Draws unwelcome attention from passers-by. She is without clothes even to cover herself properly. At least I have this for myself.’

They returned to their car without a word. She was sure there was another shawl in the bedroom closet.

End

In This World Of Connected Computers….

vide Gopalaswamy

Perhaps more appropriate to eastern cultures?

**

Father is flying a kite.

His son is watching him carefully. After some time son says:

“Dad. because of the string the kite is not able to go any further higher.”

Hearing this, the father smiles and breaks the string.

The kite goes higher and then shortly after that, it comes and falls on the ground.The child is dejected and sad.

The father sits next to him and calmly explains:

“Son, in life we reach a certain level and then we feel that there are certain things that are not letting us grow any further like Home, Family, Culture etc. We feel we want to be free from those strings which we believe are stopping us from going higher.

But, remember son.”That our home , family and culture are the things that will help us stay stable at the high heights .If we try to break away from those strings our condition will be similar to the kite – we’ll fall down soon.”

**

Life is Beautiful 😊Stay connected👍

Wishing you A Happy Makar Sankranti. Pongal Lohri, Bhigu…

End

PS: Makar Sankranti marks the arrival of harvest season. Widely celebrated, kite flying, bonfires, fairs, surya puja in river, feast, arts, dance, socialization, Cow Pooja…mark the festival.

Good Reasons To Be…

…doing the right thing!

A story from Africa vide V Narayanan

**

At the time of the great King Obatala:

Three people came to him dragging a young man with them and said to him:

‘O King!! This man has murdered our father.’

Obatala: ‘Why did you kill their father?’ 

Young man: ‘I’m a goatherd. My goat ate from their father’s farm, and he threw a stone at my goat and it died; so I also took the stone and threw it at their father and he also died.’

Obatala: ‘Because of this, I pass judgment, on charge of murder, by sentencing you to death.’

The Young man said: ‘Oh King, I ask for 3 days before you execute the judgment. My late father left me some wealth and I have a sister to take care of. If you kill me now, the wealth and my sister will have no guardian.’

Obatala: ‘Who will stand for your bail?’ 

The Young man looking into the crowd, pointed at Lamurudu.

Obatala asked: ‘Do you agree to stand for him, Lamurudu?’

Lamurudu answered, ‘Beeni (yes).’

Obatala enquired further: ‘You agree to stand for someone you don’t know, and if he doesn’t return you’ll receive his penalty.’

Lamurudu answered: ‘I accept.’

The Young man left; but after two days and into the third day, there was still no sign of the Young man. 

Everyone was afraid and sorry for Lamurudu who had accepted to receive the penalty of death if the man failed to return.

Just before it was time for meting out the punishment to the poor Lamurudu, the goat herdsman  appeared looking very exhausted and he stood before King Obatala. 

The Young man spoke up: ‘I have handed the wealth and the welfare of my sister to my uncle and I am back to receive the penalty. You may execute the penalty now.’

In great shock and surprise, Obatala said: ‘And why did you return after having a chance to escape the death penalty?’ 

Young man: ‘It would then appear humanity has lost integrity and the ability to fulfill promises kept.’

Obatala turned and looked at Lamurudu and asked him:  ‘And why did you stand for him?’

Lamurudu responded: ‘It would then appear humanity has lost the will to do good to others.’ 

These words and events moved the complainant  brothers who had  wanted justice for their father’s death very deeply and they decided to forgive the young goat herdsman. 

A furious Obatala asked: ‘Why?!!’

They said: ‘It would then appear as though forgiveness has lost place in the heart of humanity.’

End