Antidotes To Post-Retirement Blues: Two Views

 

Ray Mitchell sends out a daily post, available here, that I look forward to  – it’s a delightful collection of clean and simple humor interspersed with quotes and with a short preface of an observation or a tip from him on life, leaning more on how our advanced years may be spent engagingly and enjoyably.

His wisdom in a recent post:

“…

It is hard for me to believe that I retired the first time more than twenty five years ago. I retired for the last time fifteen years ago. As most of us who have retired have learned the walking away from colleagues leaves a void as we are no longer spending time with our workplace friends. As time goes by old friends move away and others pass on.

In truth I have learned that the worst disease accompanying old age is loneliness. I have benefited from the fact that my hobby of collecting new friends has made my later years some of the happiest of my life.

I think I have shared with you before that we must refill the chairs occupied by our friends when they leave for if we don’t the day may come when they are all empty and we are alone.

Here are thoughts taken from a lecture by Robert Waldinger, a professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School on why we need to continue to make friends:

…”

A couple of days ago, chatting with my cousin – a Phd in high-voltage engineering with long years in R & D in industry and in academics – feeling a bit low, I was bemoaning an overwhelming feeling in these post-retirement years of not actively contributing in any sphere of activity, never mind the reasons (health, etc.).

The way I was seeing it – he assured me it was no different with him.  But the companionship and presence he was providing to his spouse and family, he thought, was a very significant and satisfying contribution from him that was not possible during employment. Very well articulated, it did seem so to me.

Both Ray’s and my cousin’s views/tips make good sense -they are simple and seem perfectly adoptable in one’s life; and it has worked for them.

Well, let me see what I do with it.

End   

 

PS: My thanks to Dr. S R. Kannan for his interesting perspective..

 

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5 thoughts on “Antidotes To Post-Retirement Blues: Two Views

      1. I will retire only when my body fails to read and write I guess! so many years or none- because it will also happen when I die 🙂

        my palms say I wont live more than 55 years, that will be 8 more years. cool, eh?

        Liked by 1 person

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